Sia Taylor: The rainbow connection

Pieces from the Chasing Rainbows collection arriving soon

Sia Taylor has way of seeing precious metals like an artist’s palette. “Over the past few years, I have worked to develop a language of colors to be composed in almost infinite combinations,” explains the British jeweler. With her signature simple and minimal aesthetic, known for its softness and warmth, Taylor’s expanded range of metals has allowed her to take a more “painterly approach” to her work, she says—“to play with colors, and how they sit together.”

Pieces from the Chasing Rainbows collection arriving soon

Nowhere is that artistic freedom more evident than her two rainbow-themed collections, Gold Rainbows and Chasing Rainbows. Juxtaposing an array of twinkling precious metal hues, they explore the concept of nature’s fleeting beauty, which is endemic to her work: think falling rain, rainbows and leaves moving gently in an invisible breeze. 

The delicate, handcrafted pieces are a natural evolution of Taylor’s work since the launch of her namesake line in 2007, dreamed up during a year spent in Botswana’s Okavango Delta (this, followed by a 12-year stint in a forest on the island of Ibiza, which also informed her nature-driven aesthetic). “No collection is entirely distinct. They all grow through, lead into and blend into each other,” says the Somerset, England-based designer, who also holds a masters degree in sculpture from the Royal College of Art in London.

Pieces from the Chasing Rainbows collection arriving soon

 Chalk it up to the fluidity of Taylor’s work, and the artist’s trial-and-error process of experimenting with varying techniques and combinations until she lands on a design that captures what she hopes to convey. Take, for example, the cascading Rainfall earrings. “The way the lines of rainbow golds are assembled means that they shimmer when worn, capturing a sense of light through rain falling,” says the artist.

“I’m enchanted by trying to capture these quiet, often overlooked little events, and to hold their essence in these precious little objects,” says Taylor. “It’s about sensations rather than a literal representation.”